Dead flowers

Yesterday, as I came back from lunch, there was a surprise waiting on my desk – a plastic flower. It was a tulip of an unnaturally purple hue, and it had a card on it. Apparently, I have an account manager at the university library, and she wished to greet me by sending this flower. Well, not just me, my colleague Laura also got one. At first, I was quite surprised, but then I thought its actually a nice jesture. Since I’m not Mr Greenfingers, a plastic flower is actually handy. (how ironic by the way, that my research is on biological corrosion protection).

Anyway, the flower and the card did get me thinking of what the lady at the library can do for me, and I think I can use her help. As a first assessment of where to direct the research, I would like to know how many publications are on the topic of corrosion, biofilms and their interaction. Hey – that’s what library professionals are for! My account manager should be able to teach me to find the amount of publications on a certain topic. Thank you for the flower – and for getting me thinking.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Dead flowers

  1. Isn’t it nice to be surprised! Isn’t it nice to know that there is someone or something that can support you in your research endeavours. Your account manager may not always know the answers to your questions but will always be able to find someone whoe does know the answer. And that’s what counts. During your PhD research you will learn that you do not always have to know the answers but you will learn WHEN you can give an answer to a question and when not. I am quite curious though why you wish to know the ‘amount’ of publications on the specific subject.?

    • The amount of publications is an indicator of the amount of research dedicated to the issue. If a specific area is not well-covered in publications, then there are gaps in knowledge there. At least, that’s the assumption. It is of course possible, that the subject is just not interesting, but that’s a different story.

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